“Because of We Stories we are inspired to get involved and try to be a part of the solution, not simply bystanders contributing to the problem.”
— a We Stories parent

About Our Programs

Everybody in St. Louis understands that racial inequity is a huge challenge for our region today, and most people want to see a racially equitable future. But most White families have been standing on the sidelines, because they don’t know what they can do, or they’ve been led to believe it’s not their work to do. Yet people of color can’t do this work alone. If our region is ever going to achieve racial equity, a critical mass of White people need to be invested in it, too.

That’s why We Stories engages White families. We focus on families because we came to this challenge first as parents, wrestling with the questions of not only How do I talk to my kids about what is happening in St. Louis right now?, but also What can I do to change things so my kids don’t grow up in a divided, inequitable city?

Becoming a parent is life-changing. It forces us to re-examine our own upbringing, challenges us to see through a new lens things we’ve long taken for granted, and encourages us to do and to be better. In this historical moment, more and more White parents in St. Louis are asking how they can be part of the solution.

We Stories uses diverse children’s books to help these parents start and strengthen family conversations about race and racism, and connects those parents to parents like them who are navigating these conversations too. This support network empowers these parents to act and to advocate for racial equity across the region. We Stories families are speaking up and making change in their homes, their schools, their communities, and across the region.

Our programs offer an ecosystem of support for White parents who want to be a part of the change in St. Louis.

 
 
“Because of We Stories I feel more strongly about my responsibility to stand up for racism and inequity in my community. I also feel like I am paying more attention to a variety of issues that might have previously escaped my notice.”
— a We Stories parent