Let's Be a Community that Invests in Anti-Racism and Racial Equity Across the Board!

Let's Be a Community that Invests in Anti-Racism and Racial Equity Across the Board!

Did you know that Give STL Day (May 1) is the important fundraising day of the year for We Stories? We know that it can be a noisy day in our region and that some folks have a love/hate relationship with this 24-hour fundraising event. But for us at We Stories we’ve really come to embrace this important day. Really! We mean it.

Let us tell you 5 Reasons why we LOVE/LOVE Give STL Day.

Who does this brokenness serve? Well...us : Comments from the EHOC Conference

Who does this brokenness serve? Well...us : Comments from the EHOC Conference

As we pushed strollers around Forest Park, she shared the question that was keeping her up at night.  “Why - given how philanthropic our region is, compelling our research base is, and how incredibly sustained our protest movement has been - are we so stuck?”

Together we wondered: Who is responsible for holding the status quo in place? Who was giving elected officials and leaders the impression that the costs of doing nothing were low, and the costs of doing something were too high? Who does this brokenness serve? Well...us.

White Parents' Role in Replicating Inequality and Our Responsibility to Get #offthesidelines

White Parents' Role in Replicating Inequality and Our Responsibility to Get #offthesidelines

One week ago nearly 400 of us sat together for an evening of extraordinary connection, challenge, conviction. When most people looked around the room they saw friends, neighbors, their children’s teachers, peers and community leaders who have been instrumental in their own anti-racism journeys.

Together we considered our role in the systems we have and our responsibility in helping to create the systems that we want - and that our region’s children deserve.

Planting the Seeds of Community: Seedfolks and More

Planting the Seeds of Community: Seedfolks and More

Celebration in the face of mourning. Love in the face of pain. Connection in the face of fear. This is humanity at its richest. Sharing in that humanity together is the essence of community. The human experience is a story of trauma and tragedy, as well as one of love, connection and hope. As we face the world with our children, and engage in difficult explanations and conversations, we have the opportunity to introduce stories of joy, healing and restoration. As Fred Rodgers  famously said, “Look for the helpers.” And if you look hard enough, there they are.

At the Intersection: Erasing and Minimizing Women of Color

At the Intersection: Erasing and Minimizing Women of Color

Our history is positively brimming with amazing women who gave their talents to help industries and our society as a whole progress and be more inclusive. Some, we are very familiar with - Harriet Tubman or Susan B. Anthony - and have learned snapshots of their contributions through school or popular culture. Many others, especially Women of Color, are all too often left out of the history books or the mainstream narrative. And that leaves us all the poorer, because we miss out on giving our kids real-life examples of women in different fields, and flourishing in those roles.

Black History Month 2019 - Everything Old Is New Again

Black History Month 2019 - Everything Old Is New Again

Every year, the Association for the Study of African-American Life and History (ASALH) sets a new theme for Black History Month and continues that theme throughout the year. 2019 is the year of reflecting on the Great Migration - the 50 years that saw over 6 million Black people leave the South for the social and economic opportunities the North had to offer. And with the opportunity to better understand the history of our past, we can also use it to help us interpret some of the important trends we are seeing today...what some are calling the “Reverse Great Migration.”

Meet Christian Robinson! -- & his new book 'Another'

Meet Christian Robinson! -- & his new book 'Another'

The Novel Neighbor, The College School, and We Stories welcome you to join NY Times bestselling author and Caldecott Honor-winning illustrator Christian Robinson ("Last Day on Market Street") as he shares his newest picture book, "Another."

Tickets are required to attend the event and include two seats, a copy of "Another," and entrance to the signing line following the author presentation. Additional copies of Mr. Robinson's books will be available for purchase at event. Additionally, attendees may bring one book from home for signing.

WHEN: March 6th - Doors will open at 6:00pm.
WHERE: The College School, 63119

Author of White Kids Comes to St. Louis! Tickets Available

Author of White Kids Comes to St. Louis! Tickets Available

Join Us for an evening of conversation with Scholar, Professor, and Author Margaret Hagerman whose landmark research on white children’s racial attitudes is chronicled in her recent book, White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America.

This is a ticketed event on April 1, 2019 @ 7pm. Price includes author discussion and a signed hardcover copy of Dr. Hagerman's book. PURCHASE YOUR TICKET TODAY!

This truly riveting book is based on two years of research involving in-depth interviews with white kids and their families, is a clear-eyed and sometimes shocking account of how white kids learn about race. In doing so, this book explores questions such as, “How do white kids learn about race when they grow up in families that do not talk openly about race or acknowledge its impact?” and “What about children growing up in families with parents who consider themselves to be ‘anti-racist’?”

We Really Do Care, Do You?

We Really Do Care, Do You?

Sociologist Maggie Hagerman has been documenting white kids’ racial attitudes over the last decade and is observing a shift from “I don’t see racism or think racism exists” to “I see racism but I don’t care.”

Her research on the dangers of racial apathy serves as one of the strongest calls for our work at We Stories that we’ve seen.

Psychologist Derald Wing Sue explains this same shift and introduces an important concept: instead of a “conscious desire to hurt,” racial apathy conveys a “failure to help.”

Hagerman explains “that failure is twofold: it is not just a failure of action, it’s a failure of empathy — it’s the failure to even care about the persistence and consequences of racism in the United States. This “failure to help” — this failure to concern oneself with the suffering and humanity of others — is a powerful tool, used to reproduce and perpetuate existing racial oppression.”

This underscores what we know and see and fear. Left unspoken, unpacked, and unchallenged we who are not most impacted (white people) become numb and apathetic. We create a normal that accepts, allows, and perpetuates racism. Our children notice. And they do as we do. They fail to help too.

Together, We Became Helpers

Together, We Became Helpers

“Look for the helpers” is a quote that is often attributed to Fred Rogers. It circulates via meme every so often on Facebook, usually in response to news that is hard to bear. We’ve always loved that quote and even incorporated it into the curriculum for our Family Learning Program.

And while it is true that Mr. Rogers spoke these words, he didn’t say them first. His mother did.

“Look for the helpers” was what Fred Roger’s mother would tell him when something tragic happened. It was her way of seeding hope for her son when things felt impossibly sad and hard. And that lesson stuck, shaping young Fred’s worldview which he later shared with the world.

The meaning of this quote has deepened as our We Stories experience has grown. You see, we tap into the very same power of parents to shape hope and possibility for the future.