EXPANDING OUR UNDERSTANDING OF BELONGING

{From time to time we offer a sneak peek into what families in the We Stories are talking about. This resource was shared with We Stories families last month and we share it again today as themes of belonging are still heavy on many of our minds.}

Current events, rhetoric and the immigration ban in particular have placed an outsized and urgent focus on concepts of American-ism and belonging. For families not directly impacted by recent policy shifts it can be easy to talk about current events in a way that emphasizes others. Instead, we encourage you to continue to consider and discuss:

How are we a part of the story?

{Family Conversation Questions} 

  • What is your own family’s history? When and how did you become American?
  • How, as ONE OF MANY stories of America, does your family’s story differ from others?
  • What do our ideals and values say about who we could be as a country?
  • Where do we as a country fall short of these values?
  • How might your family contribute to an America that is welcoming, inclusive, and honors the pain and promise of our histories of immigration and belonging?

{Book Set}  

These books will help you open a conversation about what it feels like to not belong and what we can do to help others feel welcome:
My Two Blankets, I'm New Here, Seeds of Friendship, and Emma's Poem

 

As always these books can be found at Novel Neighbor, Eye See Me, Left Bank Books, St. Louis County Library System, and Kirkwood Public Library. Please call first.

{Video}  

Kids Asking Kids: "What's It Like to Have No Home?"

 

{Parent Learning}   

Many of us are digging into history and policy that may be new or not very familiar. We hope that these resources help provide some context and perspective.

U.S. Immigration Policy Timeline: A Long History of Dealing with Newcomers
History of the United States’ Immigration Policies
How Many Refugees Does the US Actually Let In?
Homeland: Immigration in America – video series

We'd love to hear about the conversations you've been having about immigration and belonging with your children.

Comment